The cost of workplace injury

When an employee sustains a workplace injury, the costs incurred are often more than financial.

While injuries in the workplace cost the Australian economy more than $60 billion each year, it is important to remember the impact injuries can have on social, human and organisational levels.

Social

An employee who has been injured at work often has to be supported by the community through treatment, in some cases for quite a long time.

A worker who has been injured may need a great deal of support. An example of community support is when workplace rehabilitation services are used to assist the employee back into work.

Human

A workplace injury can have permanent effects on the quality of life of the worker, which can also cause a strain on family, friends and coworkers.

Even when workplace injuries are only temporary, the loss of confidence may affect the worker long after the physical symptoms have healed. Depression is also a common mental health issue, especially when there are lasting physical effects from the injury.

It is also possible in more extreme cases that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder may affect the worker and any colleagues who witnessed or were involved in the incident.

Organisational

When an employee is injured, it may mean they cannot work. Whether this is for a day, a month or a year, the time off can cost the company money through sick pay obligations and a loss of productivity.

If the worker is unable to return to their pre-injury position, the company will have to find a replacement worker. This costs money in advertising, recruiting and training.

Other costs incurred can include repairing damaged equipment, increased insurance premiums, alterations to the workplace to prevent future accidents and lost business due to the damage to the reputation of the company.


For information and advice on how your company can reduce the costs of a workplace injury through worksite assessments rehabilitation and injury prevention, contact the team at WorkFocus Australia today.